Posts Tagged ‘biquille’

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Aberdour sortie July 2017

July 12, 2017

When we set sail on Saturday afternoon, we weren’t entirely sure where we were going to end up. We sailed down river under the three bridges, enjoying the sunshine en route, and eventually set a course for Dalgety Bay. When we arrived, a 26/27ft yacht was already in the small harbour. We considered squeezing in ahead of the yacht, but unfortunately she was badly parked and even although our twin-keel Macwester Malin only draws a metre, it was doubtful there was enough water. So we reversed back out and headed further east towards Aberdour.

There were loads of yachts racing in Aberdour bay as ABC, the local club’s regatta was in full swing, so we kept our sails under wraps and picked our way through the field.

Once we had tied up, we were delighted to hear that the local harbourmaster had bought Vaago, a Macwester 27 over the winter. We found out later that our chum on Joint Venture was the overall race winner. The next day a handful of yachts from RFYC over in Granton turned up for lunch, but didn’t stay. Sunday was a pretty drab and dank affair all day long, but there were breaks and we made sure that we were out and about ashore when we had the opportunity. Whereas when the rain was on, I spent my time carrying out some minor repairs that needed to be done.

The remedial work included replacing the deck fitting for the navigation light at the bow (above), and coming-up with an interim solution to keep the aft cabin hatch open and out of the way until I organise a proper stainless steel stay. This will allow me to use the helm seat (which sits on top of the aft cabin’s lower washboard), that I made a few weeks ago.

We sailed back home on Monday afternoon. Ten minutes after leaving, not far out of the harbour, we spotted our first puffin of the season. He was pretty close, but unfortunately didn’t hang around until I was able to photograph him. Pity. Anyway, with plenty of time in the bag to reach our mooring, we sailed leisurely towards the bridges.

Just north of Hound Point, we heard a shout out over the VHF from Aberdeen Coastguard. They asked if there were any craft in the vicinity of Hound Point as they wanted to follow-up a call for help that they understood came from a small boat near an oil terminal in the Forth Estuary. They ‘thought’ it might be Hound Point.

We couldn’t see anything near Hound Point, but let the coastguard know that we could just see a small craft off Braefoot Bay terminal back at Inchcolm which looked as though it was drifting aimlessly. The coastguard asked us to turn around and go check it out, so we brought our sails in and headed back east. About thirty minutes later we had reached the boat we had spotted and it wasn’t in any trouble. So it proved to be a bit of a wild goose chase …but I guess it’s better to be safe than sorry. After the coastguard had told us we could stand down, we made a beeline for our mooring, as the oodles of time that we previously had in hand were now sadly MIA.

Back on our mooring with the tide receding, we didn’t have time to leave our Macwester Malin in the neat and tidy state we would have liked, however we sorted that out a couple of days later …along with spending some time out on deck with a sundowner in the sunshine (view from our deck above).

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Double ketch up at the Bay

October 6, 2016

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With just a fortnight until crane-out we were keen to get out on the water at the weekend. We had planned to be sailing on the Friday, but for one reason or another that didn’t happen. Instead we motored east into a light easterly, with Christina II [above] keeping us company on the way to the bridges that cross between North and South Queensferry.

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Our chums from Ragdoll, a Westerly 33 ketch had plans to anchor off Inchcolm overnight and asked us if we would like to join them. Overnight anchoring doesn’t sound like a recipe for a great night’s sleep and there’s not much scope for shorepower, so we decided to pass opting for Dalgety Bay instead.

We moved our Macwester Malin, which floats in just a metre of water, further up the small harbour than usual. We could get to within about five metres of the beach, which looked a little surreal.

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Approaching high water, Ragdoll arrived from Inchcolm to the east, and had no problems getting in behind us, despite having a 1.7m draft and taking a somewhat sub-optimal route in (over some sizeable rocks).

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The weather was really good for early October. The harbour master dropped by for a chat and we enjoyed what was left of the afternoon in the sunshine.

We had dinner onboard our Macwester Malin and didn’t make it to the clubhouse this time around, opting instead to have drinks onboard.

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The following morning, we had bacon and eggs onboard for breakfast, and then went for a walk west towards St. David’s Harbour. By the time we had talked to some of the local club members who wandered along to see the yachts, it was time to get ready for sailing back up the river.

We waited [tum-te-tum, have we really finished all the crosswords?] until Ragdoll had reasonable clearance so that we could sail west together. Yes, there’s no absolutely doubt a fin-keeler is quicker, but then if we were truly racing …we would have been across the finishing line before Ragdoll even floated! In orange text for Ragdoll’s skipper ; )

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Out on the water there wasn’t all that much wind. We were only making about 2-3 knots over the ground, and given that we hadn’t left as soon as we floated [did I mention that we waited for Ragdoll?], I handed the helm over to the crew and started calculating how much time we had to reach our mooring. It was sunny and given that the crew had everything under control, I cracked a cold beer which had been popped into the freezer from the fridge as we were leaving. It was so Jean-Claude Van Damme cold my brain stopped working momentarily.

When I was eventually ‘back in the room’, I managed to work-out that we needed to do some motorsailing, so we switched on our Macwester Malin’s Lombardini diesel engine and doubled the pace.

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By the time we reached Dhu Craig we had reverted back to just using sail power. The shot above shows Erin, the 49ft Jeanneau we spent some time aboard the previous weekend, heading back east.

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With no engine power, our pace dropped back down to around 2.5 knots. Ragdoll passed to our port as she was heading into the harbour at Brucehaven for an hour or two, before heading back to the marina at Port Edgar.

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On the final approach to our mooring, the skipper of Solveig and his son came out to greet us in their dinghy. At the time we weren’t sure what their dinghy was called, so we christened her Smallveig. They were having a great time.

Just one more weekend to go until crane-out, so fingers crossed that the weather holds!

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Crane-out 2015

October 12, 2015

Last few remaining yachts

As has been the case every year since we bought our Macwester Malin back in 2011, crane-out turned-up with the predictable frequency of an appointment card for your dental check-up. It’s hard to believe that six months have gone by since crane-in.

Above: We were the last to leave our harbour, with Ramillies and Calloo [right] both slipping their moorings a few minutes earlier.

Macwester Malin 32 mooring

The weather was good, with a light easterly. In fact, the weather in September and October 2015 was better than much of the preceding El Niño summer.

River Forth crane-out 2015

Having procrastinated for as long as we could, we set sail with all the alacrity of a doomed sinner heading for the gallows. Ramillies was already heading in towards the crane, as can be seen in the shot above. When we reached roughly where she was fifteen minutes later, we had to hang around with Calloo for at least half an hour as there was a bit of a queue for the executioner.

Macwester Malin in slings

Eventually, inevitably, we got the call …and within seconds of coming alongside, our Macwester Malin had a pair of strops underneath, and her keels were dangling in mid-air.

At least the end was quick.

Macwester 32 in slings

The lift went well with no winds or other issues to be concerned about. In fact, I’d say that process-wise, it was the most relaxed crane-out that she’s had over the last five years.

Macwester Malin on the hard

A few short minutes later, she was firmly planted on five sets of wooden sleepers. As you can see from above, the antifoul paint was dirtier than we would normally expect, but that appeared to be the same for the other yachts in the yard.

Six months of consignment to the hard standing starts here.

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Escape to Port Edgar & Dalgety Bay

August 19, 2015

Wideshot River Forth from onboard

We managed to squeeze in a quick overnight at Port Edgar when a brief break in the unseasonal weather appeared. Above shows a panorama iPhone photograph looking towards Rosyth, taken from on-board our Macwester Malin. After a meal at the local Chinese restaurant, we enjoyed a good night with friends on-board their Moody 31, Calloo.

Macwester Malin Dalgety Bay

A few days later we set sail for Dalgety Bay. The weather forecast was mixed, but we had plans to be away for well over a week. As you can see from the shots above and below, the harbour at Dalgety Bay is very small, but the pier provides pretty good protection no matter which direction the wind is blowing from.

Macwester Malin Harbour @ Dalgety Bay

We enjoyed a couple of barbeques, went for walks along the coast, and I spent ages trying to capture just one of several fish jumping instances that were taking place. The best I managed was a distant splash which I won’t bore you with here.

InchcolmRiverForthReflections

After three or four days we set sail pre-8am. The shots above and below show the view off our stern to the east. I’m not one hundred percent sure that these truly captured the liquid metal sensory immersion that we experienced; it was truly breath-taking.

Hound Point River Forth Reflections

The view to the west was pretty too, if more mundane (as you can see below). The contrast between what we were seeing behind us compare to the view forward was notable. If you notice the tanker above at Hound Point (looking backwards to the east), and then spot the same tanker on the left of the picture below, you’ll get some indication of what I’m trying to describe.

RiverForthViewWest

Our next destination was Port Edgar for the 2015 East Coast Sailing Festival. If you know the River Forth then you’ll see that’s where our bow is pointing.

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Euro Mac prices on the rise

October 3, 2012

Macwester Wight and Malin for sale

Back in April this year I posted a short article on strong asking prices for 32ft Macwesters (click here) in the Eurozone.

Now that we’re at the end of the 2012 season, there doesn’t appear to be any softening of asking prices …in fact if anything they appear to have drifted up a little according to two examples that I noticed for sale recently.

There was a €40,000 Macwester Wight MK II for sale lying in Germany and a €38,000 Macwester Malin for sale lying in Turkey (best I can tell). With the current Euro/GBP exchange rate that places both of those examples North of £30,000. While I haven’t done the math on the exchange rate now versus the exchange rate back in April, these remain pretty healthy valuations given the prolonged economic downturn, and typical softening of prices at the end-of-season.

If this upwards trend continues, I might have to dig out my polish!

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