Posts Tagged ‘macwester aft cabin’

h1

Homemade helm seat

June 19, 2017

The cockpit on our Macwester Malin is deep compared to most centre cockpit yachts that we’ve seen, and as a result when you need to keep a close eye on things there’s really no substitute for standing behind the wheel.

On longer journeys we either stand, or sit on the raised, padded cockpit cushions. Having made good use of the helm seat on Ragdoll during our Irish Sea trip (here) earlier in the season, I decided that it was time for us to have a third option, and so set about making a helm seat from leftover material that I had stored away. As you can see from the photograph above, I didn’t have any suitable hardwood for the seat top and given that the seat is detachable, I used softwood instead. If that becomes a problem, then I can always make V2 from hardwood.

I didn’t faff around with anything too complicated. I just took some measurements and then cut, shaped, and joined pieces of wood until they were robustly constructed, finally fine-tuning the aggregated item to be a snug fit over the lower washboard from our aft cabin. I purchased some waterproof-backed canvas-like material for about £7.00 from eBay, and my step-daughter crafted a simple cover for the leftover foam that I previously cut to shape with a sharp Stanley knife. I used velcro to attach the cushion to the wooden base. Total spend less than £10.

The finished helm seat doesn’t look entirely out-of-place. Yes it’s fair to say that the new navy blue cover isn’t a precise match for the existing blue canvas wheel cover, but the wood staining and varnishing isn’t too far away.

I tested the new seat over the weekend and it worked well, with no movement in any direction whatsoever. So I’m pleased with the fit, even if the finish could be a little better.

Advertisements
h1

Last hurrah 2016

October 12, 2016

dhucraigseal01

Early on Saturday morning, just as our chums from Calloo were returning from Port Edgar, we were heading over there for our final overnight trip of the season. It would have been great to catch up with them, but unfortunately it wasn’t to be.

Out on the water, we passed Christina II, and spotted a solo seal basking in the autumn sunshine on Dhu Craig.

queensferryclosing2016

As we passed under the Queensferry Crossing it seemed likely that the gap would close soon; in fact that turned out to be the following day (although there are still two gaps yet to be closed elsewhere).

Our berth for the weekend was on the east side of the marina, which is closest to the Forth Road Bridge and gets much less protection from the breakwater. Not ideal. We had asked for a better berth that we knew was free, however the staff refused claiming that it wasn’t available (not surprisingly the berth we requested lay vacant for the duration of our stay).

wheelcover2016

We had no fixed plans for our time in South Queensferry. I checked that our new wheel cover fitted (which it did). We strolled around the pontoons after returning from the local mini-market. Later, the crew hosed down our Macwester Malin one last time.

macwestermalinportedgar2016

It was peaceful, uneventful and enjoyable. After dusk it became apparent that we weren’t going to get a decent sleep in the aft cabin (due to our bumpy berth), so we moved the bed linen through to the forepeak and spent the night there. That was after I nipped round for a quick chat with our friends on Ragdoll, who had arrived late on Saturday. Team Ragdoll were getting up early in the morning and heading over to Granton with the skipper of Solveig, a Westerly Konsort.

Latterly, we decided not to tag along, and opted instead for a relaxing day in the marina.

inchmickerycowcalves01

The next morning, we chomped through our ubiquitous bacon and eggs for breakfast. The shot above shows Inchmickery and the Cow and Calves, (the three dark blobs) in front of Inchkeith, which I snapped on our way to Granton.

It took us until around 10.30 to accept that we both really wanted to be out on the water. After all, with crane-out the following weekend …it was our very last chance.

We noticed the depth beneath our keels fade away to just two metres as we left Hound Point behind us and passed over a sandbank. I say ‘passed’, however what we actually did was slow to a crawl …and then gingerly retreat in the opposite direction.

grantonoct2016

A while later, as we approached the pontoons at Granton, it became clear that there wasn’t much space for us. In fact, there was no space at all. What’s more, Ragdoll and Solveig weren’t sitting on the pontoons as we expected.

That being the case, we decided to turn around and head back east. We thought that we might have one more attempt at landing on the pier at Blackness Castle before the end of the season.

inchkeithoct2016

The photograph above, shows our Macwester Malin’s bow pointed towards Inchkeith, which if you know the Firth of Forth at all, is in totally the opposite direction to Blackness Castle. I can only put our abject failure to do what we planned to do, down to fevered, last-day-of-the-season madness.

inchkeithraft2016

Fast forward thirty or forty minutes and RagdollSolveig were rafted up just a few metres away from the harbour at Inchkeith; we joined them there. We had a couple of drinks and spent some time shooting the breeze. Apparently our friends on Pampero, a Moody Eclipse had also stopped off on their way up to Anstruther.

fishinginchkeith2016

Eventually our thoughts turned to mugging fish, and before long a couple of rods magically appeared. The crew (my crew) was new to fishing and didn’t have much luck. Time for me to step up the mark and show the lil lady how it’s done.

Yup, I didn’t catch anything either. In fact, nobody had a bite all afternoon. Personally, I blame the seals; there were more congregated off our collective sterns than I’ve seen for many a year.

viewwestinchkeith2016

We probably spent more time at Inchkeith than we should have. Understandably, we didn’t want to think about heading back up river, however we knew that it would take 2.5 hours motoring and twice that sailing given the lack of wind. A couple of hours before dark, we reluctantly slipped our lines and pointed our Macwester Malin’s bow back west.

erinsunsetoct2016

As we sailed under the Queensferry Crossing, the small gap that we saw the day before had been plugged. In plugging the gap, the Queensferry Crossing entered the record books as “the largest freestanding balanced cantilever in the world”. More here.

We pressed on, and once again stumbled across Erin just off Rosyth [above]. The light was beginning to fade as we reached Brucehaven, and we made for the harbour wall. As darkness enveloped us, we ate a fishless meal and waited until the tide reached our mooring.

We set sail again about 7.30pm in total darkness. Once our eyes had adjusted to the night sky, we still couldn’t see a damn thing. Nonetheless we navigated our way to our Macwester Malin’s mooring and promptly ground to a halt about 15 metres short. Having looked at the tide tables, I reckoned that we should have had a meagre 10 cm under our keels by 7.30pm, but tide tables are just predictions …and we evidently didn’t have enough water.

Unfortunately it was too dark to see where the tide had actually reached. We tried again taking a different route, but it took a third attempt to make it on to our mooring. Obviously, there was no physical damage to our yacht as our mooring is nestled amongst thick, soft mud …and any damage to my reputation might actually represent an improvement of sorts. So it was all good.

With season 2016 relentlessly drawing to a close, next up for us is crane-out.

As ever, that has come around way too soon.

h1

July snack-sized cruise

July 25, 2016

MacwesterMalinDalgetyBayJuly2016

With dismal summer weather over the previous weekend restricting us to outings ashore, such as visiting the world’s smallest lighthouse in North Queensferry, and Preston Island, it was great to get out our Macwester Malin out on the water in fine weather. What would turn out to be the hottest day of the year so far, came hand in glove with light winds, so the moment we floated we slipped our mooring and motored to Dalgety Bay.

BBQJuly2016

The weather kept getting better and better as the day unfolded, and we enjoyed a really tasty barbecue before meandering along the coast a little on foot. We had a fab day, and later a friend from the local sailing club joined us for a night-cap onboard.

ThunderJuly2016

The heat stuck around through the night, and there were three or four hours of thunder storms in the early hours of Wednesday morning. Despite this entertaining interlude, we had a reasonable night’s sleep.

MacwesterMalinDalgetyBayJuly2016-2

The following day, we took it pretty easy again just lapping up the sunshine while we could. Then on our third day, family and friends came over for a long lunch. While not as warm as the first day, three out of five onboard ventured into the River Forth to mess around in the shallows.

DawnDepartJuly2016

After three nights in Dalgety Bay, early on the Friday morning (22nd July), I left the crew napping and singled-handed our Macwester Malin out on to the water and into a stunning dawn, before the falling tide trapped us in the harbour for the rest of the day.

Seals-HoundPointJuly2016

I made the mistake of straying too near the seals [again]. Will I never learn that the photo opportunity simply isn’t worth the stench? Note to self; buy a powerful zoom lens and/or keep a peg dangling from my skip cap.

ForthBridgesJuly2016

As I approached the bridges, I made sure that I had all the fenders and lines ready for single-handing into Port Edgar. It was really calm, so my plan was just to ease our Macwester Malin slowly into a vacant berth. Five minutes before arrival the wind picked up and I was feeling a tad less confident. Just about then, the crew surfaced and was ready to help. Our chums from Ragdoll were also on hand to catch lines, despite it being around 7.30am on a Friday morning. Both of the Ragdoll crew were up early, as they were just about to set off for Eyemouth.

PortEdgarJuly2016

After doing all the stuff we do when we arrive somewhere onboard our Macwester Malin, we had breakfast and then wandered along to South Queensferry, returning via the local store. Just as we were having lunch, at about 1pm a gaggle of red Spitfire-like aeroplanes swooped past the marina in formation. It could arguably have been the Red Arrows …if it had been 60 years earlier. We reasoned that they had strayed from the nearby East Fortune Airshow which was taking place that day. Best I can tell they were a Swiss Air Force display team called PC-7.

The rain arrived later on, and we decided to eat onboard that night rather than the local Chinese restaurant. Even later still, our friends from Miss Lindsay, a 29ft Dufour, who has just returned from a trip south to Blyth, nipped over for a few drinks and we had a memorable night.

MacwesterMalinCapernaumJuly2016

The following morning brought more showers, but we ventured out for some fresh air, dodging the worst of the rain. By mid-afternoon we set sail for Capernaum as we had a shore-based birthday barbecue to attend on Saturday. That turned out to be a really good night too, although it was over all too quickly.

We spent a second day and night at Capernaum, before reluctantly popping our Macwester back on her mooring. All-in-all, we hadn’t made it very far in comparison to Miss Lindsay and Ragdoll, but we both really enjoyed our week afloat.

 

h1

Lazy May weekend in the sun

May 17, 2016

LazyMayWeekend01

Early tides meant an early rise if we wanted to get away for our Macwester Malin’s 2016 shakedown cruise over the weekend, and the crew spectacularly failed to be enthusiastic about a 6am rise on Saturday morning.

I had loosely been planning an overnight at Port Edgar, but that will have to wait.

v-berth-access-panel01

The weather was better than forecast, however I took the opportunity to squeeze in one or two tasks below decks while we were stuck in the putty. Installing an access hatch in the v-berth was high on my agenda, as that means it will be much easier to open/close the heads inlet seacock when the v-berth is in use. As you can see above, this area still needs some further work …but it’s definitely going in the right direction.

GhautsMay01

With the tide back in promptly on the Sunday morning, the crew ventured out in the dinghy while I ticked off some more items from my pre-season to-do list. You can just about see her out in our dinghy at the Ghauts above, drifting beside a chum in a kayak, yakety-yak-yaking, while his son was wading back and forth across the Ghauts.

Having completed my tasks, I found myself hanging around on deck waiting …and waiting.

GhautsRun02

Eventually the crew returned and, racing to beat the falling tide, we took the dinghy back out to the Ghauts as we had planned earlier in the morning. The shot above shows the crew discovering that the water wasn’t quite as warm and inviting as she had imagined.

With the salty wet stuff continuing to ebb away, we parked our dinghy on the pontoons while we still could.

GhautsTideOut02

As the water receded further still, we pulled on our gum boots and walked back out to the Ghauts, and then from the far side, walked east along the water’s edge. We spent the rest of the day pottering around on deck enjoying the heat of the sun and generally taking things easy. Although we didn’t make it off our Macwester Malin’s mooring, we actually had a really enjoyable and relaxing weekend.

MooringChainMixUp01

Before I finish, I want to take a moment to thank our club’s rear commodore piers and moorings for taking swift, hands-on remedial action, when it came to light that the owner of the yacht beside us hadn’t made a particularly great job of replacing his stern mooring chains. I had become aware there was a problem (1) with our neighbour’s starboard stern chain shackled on to our port stern chain (as flagged-up by the passing skipper of Pampero), however our rear commodore discovered it was much worse than we had anticipated (2), with our neighbour’s port stern chain simply lying in the mud unattached.

All fixed now though …thanks the K-man.

h1

Forth Bridges Festival Part 2

September 15, 2014

ForthBridgeFireworks01

There were lots of yachts from our club at Port Edgar marina for the finale of the Forth Bridges Festival. We had arrived back a couple of days earlier, and along with sailing around the vicinity of the bridges, we spent time in South Queensferry as the excitement was building.

ForthBridgeFireworks04

By the time that the fireworks started (after 10pm on Saturday the 13th), there was a party atmosphere on the marina pontoons. On reflection it’s amazing that nobody ended up taking a bath, especially given that we had been getting into the spirit of the occasion …in advance.

ForthBridgeFireworks03

The fireworks were set-up on the east side of the Forth Road Bridge, and the marina is to the west, however this didn’t appear to dampen the experience too much. We completely missed the torchlight procession which had taken place before the fireworks, but it’s feasible that we just weren’t paying attention.

ForthBridgeFireworks06

In the end, the fireworks only lasted for around ten minutes, but it was a pretty impressive ten minutes. Easily the best firework-fest that our crew have seen.

Shark Toy

On top of the fireworks, I had been given a shark with a frickin’ laser beam attached to its head to play with, so I was having more fun than most.

As the fireworks subsided, we ended-up on our friends’ Moody 31, where an enjoyable if rowdy night was had by all. It was a fitting end to the season …even although it wasn’t quite the end of the season.

Sink Outlet Renewal

The following day, I discovered a leak under the galley sink, so it was back down to earth with a splash for me. Anyhoo, I did all that I could in terms of remedial work and eventually left the various bits of plumbing disassembled until I could source replacement parts. A few days later the new parts arrived, and by the following weekend I had replaced the sink outlet with shiny new components.

Macwester Malin at Blackness Castle

The weather remained better than could be expected for mid-September, so we eagerly squeezed in another great weekend before the end of the season, which now looms less than a fortnight away. Above shows us approaching Blackness Castle from the north-east.

Hopefully we’ll get one more weekend before crane-out.

h1

Photo bank; new Euro Macs

February 19, 2012

Along with other recent additions, there are three new aft-cabin Macwesters from mainland Europe; Germany, The Netherlands,  Spain now on show in the Macwester photo bank section of this website.

Why not send in your Macwester images?

If you have Macwester-related photos from the past or present that you hold copyright over, please feel free to send these in for inclusion (you retain the copyright). Please send no more than five interior and/or exterior images per example to macwesterphotos [at] yahoo.com.

%d bloggers like this: