Posts Tagged ‘Tiflex’

h1

Engine bay hatch upgrade

May 24, 2017

The engine bay hatch on our Macwester Malin also doubles as most of the cockpit sole. At some stage in the past a previous owner had covered the GRP hatch with strips of wood as shown above. Over the years since we purchased Indefatigable Banks back in 2011, the wood has slowly deteriorated and one of the strips (see top right of image above), which was broken when we made the purchase, has unsurprisingly totally failed to re-grow back to its former state.

With this in mind, I decided that it was time to bite the bullet and renovate the hatch. The largest part of the project was preparation. The wooden strips were bolted and glued on, and didn’t pay the slightest bit of attention to my reasoned arguments. Eventually, I lost patience and got physical with sharp …and blunt instruments.

Removing the wood and glue was laborious. The next stage was filling the holes left by the bolts, and repairing the isolated areas where my prolonged, careful and caressing approach to removing the wood had ripped off the gelcoat. All in all the preparation took around three days. Maybe a knowledgeable individual with more technical ability than me would have cracked through it quicker …but I’m stuck with me.

I purchased some Tiflex flooring to match the flooring that I used in the new heads and in the forepeak (see here). I also bought a couple of 60mm diameter Osculati 316 stainless steel latches. I used the hatch as a template to cut the Tiflex. Then leaving it to cure over a number of days, the Tiflex was bonded to the hatch using Sikaflex 291i.

I decided to use Sikaflex 291i because I read that the two-part adhesive alternatives tend to be near impossible to remove, whereas Sikaflex will give a permanent bond, but when the time comes to remove it, the process will be slightly less onerous.

Fitting the hatch and tweaking the latches to make sure that they were a tight fit took a few hours. Once the hatch had been fitted, I also made some repairs to the area surrounding the hatch where there had been legacy fittings. I subsequently used “Bar Keeper’s Friend” to clear accumulated grime, as the bright GRP of the renovated hatch had made the surrounding area look pretty shabby.

From start to finish the whole project probably took me around five days. That was longer than I had hoped, but I was pleased with the results. In practical terms, the new floor will be less slippy than the wood when wet, there are no longer any holes left by legacy fittings that let water ingress into the engine bay over the winter, and the new Osculati latches do a much better job of securing the hatch.

All-in-all then, another upgrade that makes our Macwester Malin better than it was before I started. So that goes down as a victory in my book.

h1

Macwester Malin heads refit – part five

May 13, 2016

ForepeakFloor01

Although not strictly the heads compartment, a related area that I tackled at the same time is the floor in the forepeak where the original heads had been located. This was also where the replacement Porta-Potti lived. It’s been a bit of an eye-sore since we bought our Macwester Malin back in 2011 and now was the perfect opportunity to put that right.

NewForepeakFloor01

When I removed the old wooden floor, I was relieved to find pristine GRP underneath. I used the old wood as a template for trimming-out the replacement Treadmaster rubber flooring. This is an even bigger improvement than the photographs above suggest.

I have also purchased a beige access hatch, which will be fitted into the vertical GRP to the right of the image above, to enable easier access to the inlet seacock when the v-berth infill is in place. Just waiting for the 140mm hole saw that I need to arrive.

HeadsVent01

It didn’t take more than a couple of minutes to fit the air vent, as I had already cut the hole in the ceiling panel, and pre-drilled the screw holes through the vent itself.

LatchedMomentarySwitch01

I used a small amount of silicon rather than an adhesive to bed in the light switch. I want to be able to remove the switch easily in the event of any electrical issues in the future.

HeadsLooRollHolder-Pump01

I made sure that the hole for the stainless steel loo roll holder was a very tight fit, as there was no obvious way of securing it in place, and as with the light switch, I didn’t want to use an adhesive. Again, I may need to remove the fitting, given the hole it sits in provides access to the pump on the right.

HeadsFloor03

I left a 3mm space to the left of the wood surrounding the Treadmaster rubber flooring, as I will source something to cover the damaged veneer. That’s probably going to be acrylic, although I’d like to source a solution a with a more natural texture if possible.

HeadsRefitProgress01

The shot above shows how the heads on our Macwester Malin is looking just now. Although there are still a few items required to complete the refit, not least fitting a door frame and door, our new heads compartment is functional. No doubt I’ll finish off some of the smaller items during the season, but installing the door and door frame is a job I’ll do after crane-out 2016.

Enough of this DIY nonsense.

Where’s my tide tables? Surely it’s time for our long overdue shakedown cruise!

%d bloggers like this: